Chris M. Lindsey

Public Administrator, Web Developer

Agile Government Leadership has a great interview with Ben Kallos, New York City Council Member.  He’s got quite an interest in technology and process reform, and it shows:

Most people think of government as slow and bureaucratic, but that isn’t a required feature. In fact, it is a bug, mostly tied to old models that were successful in the industrial era. The predominant governing model was the “waterfall method,” an approach that allows for ample input at the beginning of a project, but little—if any—during implementation or once the project is complete. Government must adapt from this industrial model to what it more closely resembles: an information and services based model that allows for continuous feedback along the way.

Rocking Chair with Grant

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I’m reminded of a passage from one of my favorite books, Fire Season by Philip Connors:

Time spent being a [wildfire] lookout isn’t spent at all. Every day in a lookout is a day not subtracted from the sum of one’s life.

The same definitely applies to time spent with a sleeping (or should be sleeping) child. These fleeting moments are some of the best moments of my life.
We celebrated Grant’s first birthday today, although it lost a little bit of the gusto when we found out yesterday morning he was sick. With little rest, the party went on, and Grant had a ton of fun. Pictures of him covered in green icing will follow, sometime, after we all catch up on a little sleep.

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In addition, I’m also a big fan of the U.S. Digital Services new Playbook for government digital services projects. Plus, it’s on GitHub!

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I’m a big fan of the U.S. Digital Service

Introducing the U.S. Digital Service:

Interacting with the government shouldn’t be a thing that you automatically dread.

-Mikey Dickerson

Every one of us in government, this should be our goal, every day.

While I love what the USDS is doing, I find it a little sad that half the discussion centers around what Mikey wears to work. Who cares? We should be talking about his results and his goals, not dress code.

Bruce Schneier on the overarching problem with the NSA surveillance:

By developing these technologies instead of helping defend against them, the NSA — and GCHQ and CSEC — are contributing to the ongoing insecurity of the Internet.

“My intention is that all code developed using taxpayer dollars within GSA should be in the taxpayer’s domain [open source].”

Sonny Hashmi, Chief Information Officer at the General Services Administration, in an interview with ExecutiveGov.

I killed Facebook and left its body in the woods. Great article from The Verge. I deleted my account just about two years ago, August 23, 2012.

Buzz Aldrin’s reddit AMA:

We in the United States cannot come close to the return to leadership that the United States had 45 years ago, and shortly thereafter.

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