ESPN Goes to Sapelo Island

ESPN’s Outside the Lines recently profiled Allen Bailey, the only NFL player ever from a tiny community on Sapelo Island, Georgia. Watch the video here.

I had the privilege to visit Sapelo Island while taking an honors course at the University of Georgia. Sapelo Island is one of those rare places in the United States (and increasingly, the world) that seems completely cut off from humanity. We studied the ecology of Sapelo Island (a barrier island with marsh on one side), but the people that live on Sapelo are a study in sociology/anthropology.

I don’t remember the Reynolds Mansion looking that nice when I visited Sapelo, nor do I remember any of the construction shown in the video. It was just a small gullah/geechee community with a UGA research facility. With great food.

Remembering Dale Earnhardt

As the cars race around Daytona International Speedway, I wanted to pause to remember a Nascar legend: Dale Earnhardt.

Today is the tenth anniversary of his passing, following a wreck on the last lap of the 2001 Daytona 500.  I will never forget watching that race as Darrell Waltrip called (and cried during) his brother Michael’s win and said, “I just hope Dale’s OK.  I guess he’s alright, isn’t he?”

SceneDaily.com has published a collection of photos of Dale Earnhardt, so go take a look.

Today, remember the Intimidator.  He was a racer from a different time and a different age.  He embodied Nascar.  And he departed way too soon.

*Update*

SceneDaily.com also published an excerpt this morning from Michael Waltrip’s new book, In the Blink of an Eye: Dale, Daytona, and the Day that Changed Everything.  This tells Michael’s side of the story of that fateful day.  Be forewarned, it’ll bring you to tears.

*Update 2*

ESPN has an incredibly touching segment on the day that Dale Earnhardt died, with some incredible videos and interviews.

Apollo 13 Transcripts, Web 2.0-Style

Spacelog.org (on my birthday) released an incredible treasure trove.  They have taken the transcripts from the Apollo and other space missions and added a little Web 2.0:

Read the stories of early space exploration from the original NASA transcripts. Now open to the public in a searchable, linkable format.

Not only is the spacelog searchable and linkable, it is tweetable.  AND, and, they’ve interspersed pictures (taken by the Apollo 13 crew and others) to the time in the log in which they were taken (like this).  This is incredible.

To accomplish this transcription, Spacelog posted the original transcripts, and then crowd-sourced the copy-and-pasting to their interface.

I love it.  They link to some of the best parts, but I have to share my own.

First, the requisite quote:

Jack Swigert: I believe we’ve had a problem here.

Jim Lovell: Houston, we’ve had a problem.

Second, my favorite (watch the movie):

Houston, Capcom: Aquarius; Houston. We’ve got you both on VOX.

Lastly, a great picture and quote:

Jim Lovell: And there’s one whole side of that spacecraft missing.

I can’t say how much that I enjoy reading through this.  Being able to relive history, in the first person, is an amazing experience.  I might be a nerd, but I love this stuff.